You Could Now End Up In Jail For Leaving Your Dog Out In The Cold, As Per New Law

There are rules prohibiting leaving a dog in a hot car in several states. In 11 of those states, it is permitted to smash windows if required in order to remove the dog from the vehicle.



Dogs in hot automobiles are typically covered by laws against animal cruelty, which are sometimes present in jurisdictions that don’t have special regulations in this area. To date, that is, because none of these states have legislation protecting pets left outside in the cold.
With the recent implementation of Libre’s Law, Pennsylvania became the first state to have regulations protecting animals from extreme heat and cold. It is against the law to leave a dog outside for more than 30 minutes in weather that is either below 32 degrees or above 90 degrees, according to Libre’s Law.

The law is named after a Boston Terrier puppy from Southern Lancaster County who, at the age of seven weeks, managed to endure appalling surroundings as well as terrible abuse and neglect until a bystander alerted the authorities to his plight.
Libre has since recovered, but his ordeal served as a catalyst for reform that now impacts all of the state’s animals. Anyone found to have broken Libre’s Law faces a maximum punishment of $750 (or up to $15,000 in serious cases) and up to one year in prison. Libre has since recovered, but his ordeal served as a catalyst for reform that now impacts all of the state’s animals.



Anyone found to have broken Libre’s Law faces a maximum punishment of $750 (or up to $15,000 in serious cases) and up to one year in prison. While Libre’s Law may not be the first in the United States to prohibit animal abuse and neglect, it is the first to be so explicit about the circumstances under which a dog may be chained outside or otherwise exposed to inclement weather.
Governor Tom Wolf of Pennsylvania, who has prioritized animal rights and welfare during his tenure in office, has passed another another bill. Act 10 of 2017, a collection of legislation governing animal welfare, include Libre’s Law.

Some people mistakenly believe that you can leave a dog outside in the cold and they’ll be alright. Although dogs have thick fur, it does not shield the pads of their feet or other vulnerable places from the effects of cold weather. For your pet, not taking these factors into account might be disastrous. Libre and other tiny breeds of dogs need to be protected from the cold.
To keep their feet warm and protected in the snow and cold, it can be a good idea to get a jacket or dog boots. These precautions will shield your dog from frostbite and other hazardous weather-related problems. Check your dog for any issues during severe weather and make an effort to avoid them.

Accidents may occur, of course, but you can take precautions to keep your dog as healthy as possible, such as yearly trips to the vet and paying attention to your dog’s requirements in various weather conditions.

Contact your neighborhood humane society, animal shelters, or animal welfare organizations if you see an instance of animal abuse or neglect.



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