Florida woman’s dog disappeared after car crash A community came together to find him.



A little Florida dog named “Goofuss” escaped from a car that was involved in an accident on Interstate 77 in the outlying Chester County, South Carolina, on July 17.

Tears were shed. Searches were conducted. There were postings on Facebook. And there were wonderful individuals performing kind deeds for an unknown stranger.

Goofuss is now secure. Goofuss now resides in Florida thanks to the kindness of the residents of Chester County.
That evening, emergency personnel including firefighters rushed to the collision. The Chihuahua that had charged into the woods was sought after.

T. Melton, head of Richburg Fire & Rescue, stated, “He was shot in the woods and we just couldn’t find him.” “It was night.”
According to Melton, the dog’s owner was a Florida woman in her 80s named Jean Powers. This wasn’t any dog, though. They were family.

Years ago, Powers adopted the dog, and ever since, the two have been inseparable.

For days, Powers and family members, including John Ladd of Union County, North Carolina, kept in communication with Melton and other people while looking for the dog. Both volunteers and firefighters were searching. According to Ladd, Chester County Animal Control assisted in setting up a humane trap close to the scene of the collision.

Ladd remarked, “It was sad.
According to Ladd, Powers spent days hunting in Chester County close to the crime scene.
She seemed to be 87 years old from the outside, according to Ladd.
While others kept looking, Ladd reported that Powers had finally gone back to Florida.
The missing dog was announced by Richburg Fire & Rescue on their Facebook page, a vital platform for rural Chester County communication. When the posts were shared, word spread.
Melton’s cell phone called on August 2, more than two weeks after the dog went missing. Everyone in a tiny rural community knows the fire chief’s phone number.

It was a woman who works at the nearby BP gas station. Melton claimed she described how a Chester County couple thought the lost dog had strayed to their house after seeing the social media posters.

Firefighters and representatives from Chester County Animal Control sped over to Amber Moore’s house to check if the dog’s microchip matched the owner’s.
Melton said, “Sure enough, that was the same dog.

Director of Chester County Animal Control Kelli Simoneau stated that Jesse Rucker-Roof and Trish Zimmerman from her office verified Goofuss’ identification and made arrangements for Ladd to pick up the dog on August 2.
The following day, Goofuss was driven all the way to Florida by Ladd’s wife.
Ladd remarked, “There are so many individuals working together to help.” It’s simply great,

Powers said in a Facebook post that Goofuss’s discovery and return was an answer to their prayers.
Powers remarked, “I owe a great debt of appreciation to everyone who made this possible.”
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Powers said she and the searchers in Chester Area, a remote county hundreds of miles from her home and roughly midway between Charlotte and Columbia, never lost up even though after two weeks any hope was dwindling in a phone interview from her Florida home.
Powers remarked, “The folks there were really fantastic.”
Goofuss, who is 6 years old, spent the first day unwinding at home in Florida, according to Powers.
Powers added, “I gave him goodies, and he’s chilling.
Simoneau of Chester Animal Control claimed that in the 1980s, when the dog was lost in a car accident, everyone concerned worked together to reunite it with its owner in Florida. She recommended all pet owners to microchip their animals so there is no doubt about which dog belongs to whom.
Goofuss was unquestionably the ideal canine.
According to Simoneau, Animal Control provides the microchip service.
Richburg is a little community with less than a thousand residents. It is situated in a small rural county with 32,000 inhabitants between Rock Hill and Columbia.

However, everyone there respects and looks out for one another.
The duty is to assist others. collaborate. Again, Melton said, that’s what residents of rural Chester County have done in times of need.
The general public, firemen, and professionals in animal welfare.
Melton said, “There’s a name for it. “Community.”

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